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Google Maps location for Coast Animal Health Lakehaven

Coast Animal Health Lakehaven
231 Wallarah Rd
Kanwal
NSW 2259

Phone:
02 4392 8822
Fax:
02 4392 0146

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Weight Loss Clinics

Learn the signs and dangers of pet obesity, and how you can help your pet stay healthy and happy.

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'Fetch' is a app that helps you manage your pet's arthritis

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Your complete guide to flea and tick control for dogs and cats.

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Feline Aids

Is your cat at risk of contracting Feline AIDS? It is estimated that 1 in 7 Australian cats that go outside carry the FIV virus (feline immunodeficiency virus is not unlike the human HIV virus) which can lead to Feline AIDS. If your feline friend spends time frolicking outdoors or has been exposed to cat fights, then it could be at risk of contracting this potentially fatal virus.
A simple blood test can provide peace of mind that your cat is not infected with this deadly disease. And most importantly, a simple vaccination program can protect your cat from infection.
THERE IS NO CURE FOR FELINE AIDS BUT IT CAN BE PREVENTED! 

WHAT IS IT?
FIV stands for Feline Immunodeficiency virus. Humans cannot be infected by a cat with FIV!
FIV suppresses the immune system of the cat, which means it cannot fully protect itself against common bacterial and viral infections.
Most commonly FIV cats present with being ‘off colour', weight loss, weakness, mouth sores or reoccurring infections.
Your vet can diagnose FIV after a thorough examination and a small blood test which detects antibodies to the virus.

HOW IS IT SPREAD?
There are a couple of ways cats can become infected with this disease. The virus is transmitted in the saliva and blood of the infected cat. The most common is by fighting with an infected cat or, less commonly, during mating..
HOW TO PREVENT FELINE AIDS ( FIV):
FIV is a preventable disease, there is a vaccine available. Please call 0243928822 and book your cat in for a FIV test and vaccination today.
WHAT DOES VACCINATION INVOLVE?
 The vaccination protocol consists of three doses of vaccine given from 8 weeks of age or after. Doses should be given 2-4 weeks apart. After the initial course of vaccines, a yearly vaccination is required.
For cats 6 months of age and older, it is recommended that an FIV test is performed prior to vaccination. Cats should test negative before vaccination. It is also recommended that cats are microchipped (if not already) at the time of the first vaccination. The 3 dose course of vaccines is then given 2-4 weeks apart.
An annual booster is also required.
 
Technically, if any one of the vaccinations is more than one week overdue, another course of 3 doses of vaccine, 2-4 weeks apart is necessary.

Is your cat at risk of contracting Feline AIDS? It is estimated that 1 in 7 Australian cats that go outside carry the FIV virus (feline immunodeficiency virus is not unlike the human HIV virus) which can lead to Feline AIDS. If your feline friend spends time frolicking outdoors or has been exposed to cat fights, then it could be at risk of contracting this potentially fatal virus.

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