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Nail Clipping

Regular nail clipping, or trimming, should be part of the routine care of your pet.  It is important to get your pup used to having his nails cut at an early age.

Most puppies and dogs don’t like having their paws touched, but nail clipping requires that you hold those tiny feet and toes – so it’s important to get him comfortable with this.

It is important to make a habit of holding and playing with his paws, one at a time. Reward him with treats.

This will make nail clipping a lot less stressful for you and him.

Nail clipping is essential for elderly and indoor pets, whereas outdoor pets may wear their nails down naturally. The requirement for nail trimming can vary depending on breed, age, level of exercise and the environment in which your pet is kept.

Some dogs may benefit from having the tips of their nails taken off once every week or two, however for most it will be longer than this, and you will have to decide what is right for your dog by inspecting its nails on a regular basis. Certainly, if you notice a change in the sound of your dog’s nails on hard floors this is a pretty good indication that it is time for a trim.

Cats also require nail clipping, with the frequency depending on their lifestyle. Indoor-only cats will need more regular nail trims whereas outdoor cats may naturally wear their nails and require less frequent trimming.

If you are not confident in clipping your dog or cats nails, book in for one of our friendly nurses to give your furry friend a manicure.

Appointments can be made by phoning 43928822.

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Nutritional Advice

Along with regular exercise and veterinary care, careful nutrition is the best way you can contribute to your pet’s prolonged good health.

These are the basic nutrients every pet needs:

Water is the most essential nutrient in any diet. Your pet’s body is made up of approximately 70% water and will quickly perish without it. Ensure your pet can access fresh, clean water at all times.

Carbohydrates supply energy and come from sugars, starch, and fibre from plant sources. Carbohydrates help energize the brain and muscles, making your pet bright and active.

Fats also supply energy and in the right amounts help build strong cells and promote nutrient absorption. Too much fat however, can lead to such obesity-related health problems such as diabetes, heart disease and osteoarthritis.

Proteins are required for a healthy coat, skin, and nails. Your pet’s body uses the amino acids in proteins to make enzymes and hormones in the blood stream and to maintain a healthy immune system. Proteins can come from plant and meat sources, but cats and dogs need a high-quality animal protein.

Vitamins and minerals help regulate many body systems. For example, your pet needs the minerals calcium and phosphorous for strong bones. Antioxidant vitamins like vitamin E and C help boost your pet’s immune system during times of stress.

Behavioural Advice

Behavioural problems can be due to behavioural causes, medical causes, or both. Our veterinarians will investigate behavioural problems by obtaining a full history and conducting a full examination (sometimes your pet may require blood orurine tests to rule out underlying medical conditions) to accurately diagnose a problem. Behavioural problems are often the combined effect of many factors, including your pet’s environment and learning.

Genetics can also predispose your pet to some behaviours, however the expression of those behaviours will depend on your pet’s early socialisation and training.

Changes in the environment may contribute to the emergence of behavioural problems. For example, changes in routine, a new member of the household (pet, baby or spouse), moving house, or the loss of a family member or pet can have a dramatic impact on behaviour. Any medical or degenerative changes associated with ageing may cause the pet to be even more sensitive to these environmental changes.

Learning also plays a part in many behavioural problems. Early training and socialisation is essential to have a happy, well-adjusted pet. Punishment of behavioural problems often worsens the situation and it is very important that professional advice is obtained as soon as the problem appears to effectively resolve it. Positive reinforcement is the preferred method for changing behaviour, however this also needs to be used carefully as it can encourage undesirable behaviour if used incorrectly.

Pet Insurance

Pet insurance is becoming more and more popular in Australia. It offers you peace of mind as it covers some or all of the treatment costs if your pet was ever involved in an accident or suffers a sudden illness. There is no equivalent of Medicare for pets, thus often treatment costs exceed what an equivalent problem would cost for a human patient. Did you know that 24 hr emergency care for animals can cost over $1000 per day? Some surgeries such as repair of fractured bones or exploratory surgery can also add up to thousands of dollars and that does not even include the recovery and aftercare treatment. It is a heartbreaking situation to have to choose between the health of your pet and financial constraints, so for peace of mind we strongly recommend that your pet is insured.

There are several companies that offer pet insurance and we can help you find one that best suits your needs and your pet.

Pain Management

If your pet is suffering from conditions such as arthritis, spinal pain, hip or elbow dysplasia, recovering from surgery or if your sporting athlete is injured, a suitable programme can be tailored to mainaging your pets pain and rehabilitation needs.

At the initial consultation we assess your pet’s muscular or joint pain, muscle strength and joint range of motion and mobility. This will enable the appropriate therapy to be selected to help in achieving pain relief and return to optimal function and fitness.

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